Tracing Family Roots Can Uncover Surprising Results


From a genetic standpoint, you could be more (or less) Italian than originally thought -- here's why.

The following article, written by Gisele Grayson, appears on The Washington Post.

My Grandmother Was Italian. Why Aren’t My Genes Italian?

Maybe you got one of those find-your-ancestry kits over the holidays. You’ve sent off your awkwardly collected saliva sample, and you’re awaiting your results. If your experience is anything like that of me and my mom, you may find surprises — not the dramatic “switched at birth” kind, but results that are really different from what you expected.

My mom, Carmen Grayson, taught history for 45 years, high school and college, retiring from Hampton University in the late 1990s. But retired history professors never really retire, so she has been researching her family’s migrations, through both paper records and now a DNA test. Her father was French Canadian, and her mother (my namesake, Gisella D’Appollonia) was born of Italian parents. They moved to Canada about a decade before my grandmother was born in 1909.

Last fall, we sent away to get our DNA tested by Helix, the company that works with National Geographic. Mom’s results: 31 percent from Italy and Southern Europe. That made sense because of her Italian mother. But my Helix results didn’t even have an “Italy and Southern European” category. How could I have 50 percent of Mom’s DNA and not have any Italian? We do look alike, and she says there is little chance I was switched at birth with someone else. Continue reading at The Washington Post. 

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