Bones Attributed to St. Peter Uncovered in 1,000-year-old Roman Church


It had been known for centuries the relics might exist; the Vatican plans to authenticate the discovery.

The following article, written by Nick Squires, appears on The Telegraph. 

Bones attributed to St. Peter found by chance in 1,000-year-old church in Rome

Bones attributed to St. Peter have been found by chance in a church in Rome during routine restoration work, 2,000 years after the apostle’s death.

The relics of the saint, who is regarded as the first Pope, were found in clay pots in the 1,000-year-old Church of Santa Maria in Cappella in the district of Trastevere, a medieval warren of cobbled lanes on the banks of the Tiber River.

The bones were discovered when a worker lifted up a large marble slab near the medieval altar of the church, which has been closed to the public for 35 years because of structural problems.

He came across two Roman-era pots with inscriptions on their lids indicating that inside were not only bone fragments from St. Peter but also three early popes – Cornelius, Callixtus and Felix – as well as four early Christian martyrs.

The workman immediately notified the deacon of the church, Massimiliano Floridi. “There were two clay pots which were inscribed with the names of early popes – Peter, Felix, Callixtus and Cornelius. I’m not an archaeologist but I understood immediately that they were very old,” he told Rai Uno, an Italian television channel. “Looking at them, I felt very emotional.”

It had been known for centuries that the relics might exist – they are recorded on a stone inscription in the church, which claimed they were kept alongside a fragment of a dress worn by the Blessed Virgin. But until now, the relics had never been found. Continue reading at The Telegraph. 

Like us on Facebook to receive more food & wine, entertainment and culture news.

Make the pledge and become a member of Italian Sons of Daughters of America today!

Share your favorite recipe, and we may feature it on our website.

Join the conversation, and share recipes, travel tips and stories.